It’s Never Too Late to Get Your GED

Since the new GED test came out as of January 2014, many students are discouraged to take the GED test. Why?

  • The new GED test is harder
  • It is all on computer
  • People who took the old battery and didn’t finish have to start from scratch
  • It is more expensive to take the test
  • New item types are now included like short answers and extended responses
  • It is now a timed test and that’s scary

 

Don’t Let This Scare You!

 

  • Yes, the new test is harder because the bar is raised to implement higher standards. However; Phoenix Tutoring & Test Prep truly believes that anyone who can pass the old test can also pass the new test. It sure requires more studying though.
  • Yes, the test is now on computer format but isn’t everything else on the computer today. This test will make you use a variety of skills including basic computer knowledge.
  • Yes, people who took the old battery and didn’t finish will have to take the subtests over again but it tests the same knowledge that was learned previously. A review of concepts will help recall the material easily.
  • Yes, it is more expensive to take the test so when you take it make sure you are prepared. Look at the expense as an investment into your future. More than 80% of jobs out there require at least a GED as a minimum level of education. By getting the GED you are making yourself look more competent for getting those jobs.
  • Yes, the GED includes new item types such as extended response, drag and drop, multiple choice, short answer, fill-in-the blanks, drop down, and hot spot. It is good to be tested in different ways. For example, if you are bad at writing extended responses you can show your skills in short answers, multiple choice or fill-in-the blanks.  If you are bad at multiple choice, you can write and show them what you know in short answer and extended responses.
  • Yes, GED is now a timed test.  You are given 150 minutes for Language Arts, 90 minutes for Math, 90 minutes for Science, and 90 minutes for Social Studies. The test prepares you for a real world skill called “working under time pressure” that is now a gold standard in most workplaces.

 

How to Study Best?

 

There are three ways to study for the GED test.

 

Do it all on your own: Take a GED prep book from a book store and self-teach. This works for people who like to work alone and can establish a good routine to set aside sometime in their schedule for GED preparation. The pitfall of this way is that if you don’t know something you are stuck and can’t move on.

 

Take a Class: Taking a GED class helps people who learn by being a part of the group. This requires commitment and adjusting your schedule to be in class. If you are working a job or having to take care of other things like children this may not work best for you. A pitfall of this way is that if you don’t understand something and need to spend more time on a particular topic its hard because the class must go on and cover what it needs to cover.

 

Get a tutor: Getting a tutor from Phoenix Tutoring & Test Prep can help you prepare for GED test step by step. A tutor will not only keep you on board but will also be flexible about meeting you regularly depending on your ongoing schedule. A tutor will work at your speed by helping you move at your pace. You can spend more time on topics that are difficult for you and move fast with things that you already know. A pitfall of this way is that it requires money but look at it as an investment into your future.

 

Why Choose Us?

Phoenix Tutoring & Test Prep offers one-on-one local tutoring services for GED at your home or at an agreed upon location in:

Phoenix, AZ

Chandler, AZ

Gilbert, AZ

Mesa, AZ

Tempe, AZ

Scottsdale, AZ

Paradise Valley, AZ

Ahwatukee, AZ

Queen Creek, AZ

Cave Creek, AZ

 

We also provide online tutoring services all over United States. To get help from Phoenix Tutoring & Test Prep please visit www.phxtutoring.com and book lessons today. You can also call or text 773-386-3184.

 

Picture retrieved from www.literacyactionnetwork.org

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